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Assuming one eye is 5 cm further down compared to the other, would that somehow change perception if the brain has long enough to deal with that incoming information? For example, if you were born that way, would you be able to do depth perception and binocular vision just as well?

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome iwab. You'll notice the "do your research" stipulation in the How to Ask section of the help center. Please show that research. For example, if an eye were positioned in the maxillary sinus instead of the orbital socket, would there be an optic-nerve to connect it to the brain? What about muscles? What do your researches into stereoscopic vision lead you to conclude in this case? $\endgroup$ Sep 19, 2023 at 1:50
  • $\begingroup$ If the eyes have the same distance then they geometric effect is the same. if the eyes were on top of each other, they would have less depth perception information when the person turns and leans their head, and they would have a greated change in depth perception when they are running. It's probably tested on robots, not animals. $\endgroup$ Sep 19, 2023 at 8:41

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Would you be able to do depth perception and binocular vision just as well? This is hypothetical question. Hypothetically, the answer is yes.

The human brain has an amazing ability to adjust to changes to an individual's physical body. As evidence of this, consider the PD (pupillary distance) when you were born to what it is now. You have the same brain (in all likelihood), but that distance has undoubtedly increased significantly. Your vision continues to work exactly as designed.

This amazing flexibility is not limited to homo sapiens. Some species of actinopterygii are born with eyes on both sides of their head, but develop into fish with both eyes on the same side of their head. Their ability to hunt does not diminish after this change takes place.

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