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Oxidases are those which uses O2, but dehrydrogenases doesn’t? Then is my book wrong ? Is it a misnomer that aldehyde dehydrogenase is correctly a oxidase?

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  • $\begingroup$ Can you quote from your book? $\endgroup$
    – Bryan Krause
    Jan 19 at 16:28
  • $\begingroup$ Nevermind, I dug it up for you. But please, in the future, if you're asking about something written in your book and you want to know if it's right or wrong, quote from your source. Otherwise, we don't know if the book is wrong or if you're misinterpreting what the book says. $\endgroup$
    – Bryan Krause
    Jan 19 at 19:04

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In Harper's Illustrated Biochemistry 32nd edition Chapter 12 in the section "Other Oxidases Are Flavoproteins" there are several enzymes listed and described. Quoting from that paragraph:

and aldehyde dehydrogenase, an FAD-linked enzyme present in mammalian livers, which contains molybdenum and nonheme iron and acts on aldehydes and N-heterocyclic substrates

The "FAD-linked enzyme present in mammalian livers, which contains molybdenum and nonheme iron" is aldehyde oxidase. This is a different enzyme than aldehyde dehydrogenase. It appears to be a typo in the textbook.

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  • $\begingroup$ Seems worth noting that oxidase and dehydrogenase are both used in common nomenclature, but not in systematic names. The IUBMB guidelines for enzyme classification and nomenclature suggest that 'dehydrogenase' could be used in the common name of any oxidoreductase, while oxidase may only be used for the special cases where oxygen is the final acceptor. (iubmb.qmul.ac.uk/enzyme/rules.html) The author of that chapter still should have known that the commonly accepted name for this particular enzyme is aldehyde oxidase. So, yes, likely a mistake. $\endgroup$
    – MikeyC
    Jan 24 at 19:11
  • $\begingroup$ @MikeyC Systematic naming conventions and nomenclature tendencies aside, there are two separate enzymes commonly called "aldehyde oxidase" and "aldehyde dehydrogenase". The description given is clearly consistent with one of them, and it isn't the one called dehydrogenase. $\endgroup$
    – Bryan Krause
    Jan 24 at 21:35
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    $\begingroup$ I agree with you, @Bryan. Just thought that a little more context about the relationship between oxidase and dehydrogenase classifications might be useful to the reader. $\endgroup$
    – MikeyC
    Jan 25 at 15:45

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