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According to the MBL guide to generating antibodies, the differences between monoclonal and polyclonal antibody extend beyond the fact that the latter is heterogeneous, binding to various epitopes for the same antigen. According to the source, monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies behave differently with respect to labeling:

Labeled (secondary) antibodies: Similarly, only one antibody molecule can bind to a primary antibody molecule if the secondary antibody is a labeled monoclonal antibody. Whereas multiple antibodies can bind to a primary antibody molecule if the secondary antibody is a polyclonal antibody. Consequently, polyclonal antibodies provide a higher sensitivity of detection (amplification of the signal) and, therefore, are commonly used as a secondary antibody.

What is the mechanism for this difference?

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The mechanism for this is (as stated in the first sentence of the quote) that in a monoclonal antibody all antibodies bind the same site (epitope), whereas in a polyclonal antibody you have a mix of antibodies that all recognize different parts of the antigen. Therefore, multiple polyclonal secondary antibodies will bind the primary at different sites, while in a monoclonal secondary there is only one site in the primary antibody that is bound.

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