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From my research it seems as though there's a difference between cardiac and skeletal muscle cells in that during depolarisation, the permeability of potassium actually decreases for cardiac muscle cells. How does this occur? I imagine it would be due to the closure of potassium channels but if this is the case, then how is the inwards current of calcium balanced during the plateau phase?

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In skeletal muscles, depolarization occurs via opening of voltage-gated sodium channels, leading to influx of sodium ions, and opening of potassium channels. However, in the case of cardiac muscles, during depolarization, voltage-gated sodium channels open, and influx of sodium ions leads to closure of potassium channels, which eventually leads to the long action potential and plateau phase. In cardiac muscles, co-occurrence of calcium channels also occurs.

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