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Can each lens of both eyes have different accommodation rates, or have a different focal length to view objects of different distances. I understand that this can be a problem known as Anisometropia, but can this happen intentionally? For instance, if you place one finger close to the eye but one finger far away, can you focus both eyes in a way so that both appear in view? Assume that the fingers are not placed in the eye's area of visual overlap. I tried this, and I wasn't able to focus on both fingers. But why is this? It seems to be that the eyes would need to be able to individually focus since objects will be different distances from both lenses, like if we look out of the corner of our eye.

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    $\begingroup$ It seems plausible to me that chameleons might be able to focus each eye independently, but I wouldn't expect that capability in monkeys and apes (humans). $\endgroup$
    – mgkrebbs
    Commented Apr 27 at 17:08
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    $\begingroup$ Welcome Astrovis. Remember to show your own research and where you got stuck as per the How to Ask section of the help center - our requirements. $\endgroup$ Commented Apr 29 at 4:03

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The answer must be an unequivocal yes and you only need to focus on one object. However, it's not quite how you describe the problem, so not quite what you mean.

If you look at a single object off to one side of your face, but within the "infinity" distance of our eyes (about six meters/19.7 feet), the path lengths between the object and each eye must be different lengths, therefore they must have different focal distances. Obviously the difference isn't massive but the decision to focus on that object is intentional and therefore you have the ability to have different focus points for each eye in an intentional system.

The ability to focus on different objects with each eye is another matter. As far as I am aware, people with Amblyopia (AKA "lazy eye") are not able to focus or not able to focus well with the amblyopic eye and suffer loss of vision control in that eye if not treated. I don't know if anyone has looked at the abilities of people who can independently control their eyes. We have dominant eyes (just as we have dominant hands), so I suspect that we would ignore the input from one eye in a situation where you were looking at two separate objects with two eyes. The Skeptics SE seems to agree with this on a question about pilots using eyes independently.

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