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So I'm reading this article to Treat Fluid Retention and it suggests

  1. Eat foods with diuretic properties.

But also

  1. Avoid drinks that will dehydrate the body such as tea, coffee and alcohol.

As I understand, tea, coffee and alcohol are plenty diuretic. So what makes those veggies's diuretic nature better than alcohol's?

I know alcohol is more harmful than veggies, but I mainly wanted to know how do diuretic veggies help you when infact the diuretic alcohol actually makes you dehyderated? How's veggies' diuretic nature more helpful than the alcohol's (disregarding other side-effects of it)?

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  • $\begingroup$ This question is primarily concerned with the mechanism behind a supposed effect of certain vegetables, and does not ask for any treatment suggestions. Voting to reopen. $\endgroup$ – jarlemag Jun 21 '14 at 16:30
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Firstly I would suggest if you have concerns about suffering from symptoms fluid overload you should consult your doctor. Self diagnosis and self treatment is not a good option.

In terms of alcohol being used as a diuretic, you have to bear in mind that there are many deleterious effects of excess alcohol. By consuming alcohol as a diuretic you would most likely cause more health problems than you solve.

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  • $\begingroup$ I was just researching remedies for Puffy face, nothing too serious. I know alcohol is more harmful than veggies, but I mainly wanted to know how do diuretic veggies help you when infact the diuretic alcohol actually makes you dehyderated? How's veggies' diuretic nature more helpful than the alcohol's (disregarding other side-effects of it)? $\endgroup$ – laggingreflex Jun 19 '14 at 12:02

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