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I have read that epimysium is dense regular connective tissue made covering the a muscle like bicep brachi. at the same time we have fascia that is made of dense regular tissue and covers muscles. so are they same or different how can we describe it and differentiate it?

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Epimysium is the specialized fascia located at the muscle.

Epimysium is a layer of connective tissue, which ensheaths the entire muscle. It is composed of dense irregular connective tissue. It is continuous with fascia and other connective tissue wrappings of muscle including the endomysium, and perimysium [1].

The fascia that covers muscle is named deep fascia:

The deep fasciae envelop all bone (periosteum and endosteum); cartilage (perichondrium), and blood vessels (tunica externa) and become specialized in muscles (epimysium, perimysium, and endomysium) and nerves (epineurium, perineurium, and endoneurium) [2].


References:

  1. Wikipedia contributors, "Epimysium," Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Epimysium&oldid=540536396 (accessed June 27, 2014).
  2. Wikipedia contributors, "Deep fascia," Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Deep_fascia&oldid=593605746 (accessed June 27, 2014).
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As I understand it epimysium is not only fibrous but also contains more elastic fibres than fascia. As such it is more 'loose' than the 'dense' fascia. It lies immediately on the surface of the muscle (epi = on, mysium = muscle) below the fascia. The deep fascia which is denser lies on top of this.

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"A fascia"

A fascia is a sheath, a sheet, or any other dissectible aggregations of connective tissue that forms beneath the skin to attach, enclose, and separate muscles and other internal organs.

"The fascial system"

The fascial system consists of the three-dimensional continuum of soft, collagen-containing, loose and dense fibrous connective tissues that permeate the body. It incorporates elements such as adipose tissue, adventitiae and neurovascular sheaths, aponeuroses, deep and superficial fasciae, epineurium, joint capsules, ligaments, membranes, meninges, myofascial expansions, periostea, retinacula, septa, tendons, visceral fasciae, and all the intramuscular and intermuscular connective tissues including endo-/peri-/epimysium.

The fascial system interpenetrates and surrounds all organs, muscles, bones and nerve fibers, endowing the body with a functional structure, and providing an environment that enables all body systems to operate in an integrated manner.

Reference: http://www.bodyworkmovementtherapies.com/article/S1360-8592(16)30259-5/fulltext

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Fascia is a widely used yet indistinctly defined anatomical term that is concurrently applied to the description of soft collagenous connective tissue, distinct sections of membranous tissue, and a body pervading soft connective tissue system. Inconsistent use of this term is causing concern due to its potential to confuse technical communication about fascia in global, multiple discipline- and multiple profession-spanning discourse environments. The Fascia Research Society acted to address this issue by establishing a Fascia Nomenclature Committee (FNC) whose purpose was to clarify the terminology relating to fascia. This committee has since developed and defined the terms a fascia, and, more recently, the fascial system. This article reports on the FNC's proposed definition of the fascial system.

Reference: http://www.bodyworkmovementtherapies.com/article/S1360-8592(16)30259-5/fulltext

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