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I read a lot of articles on the internet about how dog see the the world. But I can't find the source of these study. I want to know how did scientist setup the experiment to find out animal vision. I don't know which keyword should I use to search for the information on the internet. Can anybody please send me some research paper about the problem?

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  • $\begingroup$ A few days back I watched a documentary called Your Inner Fish. In it, there was a small segment about animal vision studies. Basically they had monkeys in a lab, looking at a screen which showed e.g. mostly blue bubbles, but then at some specific spot also red bubbles (sort of like those red-green color blindness tests). Every time the monkey poked the correct spot on the screen, it got a reward. So then they had added a third opsin gene (e.g. humans have three) to this monkey and it could separate colors that other monkeys couldn't. $\endgroup$ – 5heikki Aug 20 '14 at 6:21
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While their work was in the cat rather than the dog, your starting point should be the work of Hubel and Wiesel. They are the indisputable pioneers for vision research in general. They won the Nobel Prize in 1981 for Physiology and Medicine.

See their Wikipedia entries (Hubel and Wiesel), the original 1962 paper, their popular press book, the Nobel Prize speech about their work and Roger Sperry's, and Wurtz's review (cited below).

Hubel, D.H. and Wiesel, T.N. (1962). Receptive fields, binocular interaction and functional architecture in the cat's visual cortex, The Journal of Physiology, 160(1), 106-154.

Wurtz, R.H. (2009). Recounting the impact of Hubel and Wiesel. The Journal of Physiology, 587, 2817-2823. DOI

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Color vision was shown to be dichromatic (sensitivity to two color peaks) by Neitz et al. (1989). For a broader review of color vision of mammals, see Jacobs (1993).

Literature Cited

Jacobs, G.H. 1993. The distribution and nature of colour vision among the mammals. Biological Reviews 68: 413-471.

Neitz, J. et al. 1989. Color vision in the dog. Visual Neuroscience 3: 119-125.

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