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"One can measure two or more signals simultaneously determined by a single feature, i.e., epitope in immunomic microarray DNA microarrays measure one response value for each gene per sample; that is, mRNA concentration produced by the gene but a single epitope can generate different response values corresponding to different epitopes in peptide–MHC chips. In case of B cell epitope, it can be recognized by different isotypes of immunoglobulins, so here, one can measure both intensity and quality of antibody response."

These few lines are from the book: http://www.springer.com/biomed/immunology/book/978-1-4939-1114-1 Chapter 3

What does measure of one response value for each gene per sample mean?
Different response value means??
how is intensity and quality both are being measured??

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epitope in immunomic microarray DNA microarrays measure one response value for each gene per sample; that is, mRNA concentration produced by the gene but a single epitope can generate different response values corresponding to different epitopes in peptide–MHC chips.

The excerpt looks grammatically incorrect and is therefore confusing. I guess what it tries to convey is — like there can be several probes for a single mRNA in a normal gene-expression microarray, there can be several antibodies binding to different epitopes in the same protein. Different antibodies will bind to their cognate epitopes with different affinities. This is what is referred to as "response value"

By quality I guess what the authors mean is that for the same epitope it is possible to quantify the binding interactions between that epitope and antibodies of different classes (but same antigen binding site).

Having looked at this excerpt, I would not recommend this book to anyone.

You can also have a look at these two articles:

  1. From Functional Genomics to Functional Immunomics: New Challenges, Old Problems, Big Rewards
  2. Prospects for the Future Using Genomics and Proteomics in Clinical Microbiology
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