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As far as I know the glucose gets processed from carbs and fats and as a result carbon dioxide, water and "energy" are released. The carbon dioxide and water are expelled by the body, and then energy is used by the muscles. But how exactly is it used? What happens to this "energy" and what is it exactly?

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    $\begingroup$ Our body does not produce carbon monoxide. It does produce carbon dioxide. $\endgroup$ – Chris Sep 24 '14 at 12:46
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    $\begingroup$ Indeed, there is still one carbon monoxide in your post. $\endgroup$ – ddiez Sep 24 '14 at 12:49
  • $\begingroup$ @ddiez :)))))))) $\endgroup$ – deemeetree Sep 24 '14 at 13:12
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You can break down the energy expenditure of the human body in terms of the different organs which use it up: this is done in this biochemistry book for instance, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK22436/

You can also look at the detailed expenditure of each cell: although the amounts will vary according to cell type (neuron vs. muscle cell, say!), the "budget items" are the same. See this thread: Breakdown of energy expenditure at the level of a single cell

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks! So the "energy" is actually ATP, which is then used for different chemical processes? Is there any pattern that's common to all these processes, such as periodicity for example? $\endgroup$ – deemeetree Sep 24 '14 at 13:15
  • $\begingroup$ Not all energy goes into ATP or GTP cycles, but these are the common way of having ready-to-use energy for molecular processes, e.g. molecular motors (in muscles but also other cells, to exert forces or to carry loads around e.g.). Heat is being produced without producing ATP/GTP, e.g. $\endgroup$ – Joce Sep 24 '14 at 20:38
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    $\begingroup$ I'm not sure what you mean by "pattern". $\endgroup$ – Joce Sep 24 '14 at 20:39

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