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By lab work I mean urinalysis, blood work(live as well), fecals, cytologies, histologies and all other.

I have read(partly) a book(from 2002) on lab diagnostics and the author did not mention anything about diagnostics. I've spent a lot of time searching on google as well and I did not get anything.

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It sounds like you need a microscope for standard microbiology lab tests. At a minimum, any standard wide-field/brightfield microscope would work. If most of your histology work involves colorimetric stains (e.g., H&E, gram staining), you don't need any fluorescence capability. If you are working with a lower budget, look at the new lines of LED-based miroscopes, which dramatically drop the cost (I think around $10,000).

If you plan on doing a high volume, in particular of fixed histology/cytology slides, then you may want to invest in some of the automated slide scanner microscopes. They have a small benchtop footprint and can be programmed to image large areas automatically, for later analysis.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for your answer. I'm not planing on doing high volume, I was thinking about an upright microscope in the price range 1000-2000 $. $\endgroup$ – shooting-squirrel Nov 13 '14 at 0:17
  • $\begingroup$ Keep in mind that you will need it to have a camera to store the images, at least in a clinical or research setting. That will add quite a bit more expense. If you get creative, you can now use smartphone cameras for much less. $\endgroup$ – user560 Nov 13 '14 at 0:36
  • $\begingroup$ To more detail on the question I had in mind, I was thinking about which features such as phase contrast, darkfield, polarization, flurescence, DIC I would need. $\endgroup$ – shooting-squirrel Nov 13 '14 at 18:12

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