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Assume you have been in non-gluten diet 20 years. You built mass 8 mass with substances containing gluten (endogenous gluten stored in fat). Then, celiac disease is diagnosed. You have been 3 months in gluten free diet. After mass period, you go to fat burning period. The challenge starts: endogenous gluten stored in fat. It is painful if too intensive training program. Even little amount of gluten causes enteropathy.

What are the protectant methods for burning fat containing gluten?

How can you prove that there are no gluten-derived peptides that accumulate somewhere? Since the cellular receptors for gluten have been identified, I think this may be over-complicating things. - Ryan's answer

I have not found any good solution for this, since I do not understand the pathophysiology enough well.

Toxic factors related to celiac disease

How is endogenous gluten released from fat?

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  • $\begingroup$ Do you have any evidence that gluten is stored in fat cells? As far as I know, it can only be synthesized by certain plants... $\endgroup$ – MattDMo Dec 1 '14 at 22:35
  • $\begingroup$ @MattDMo No. This was just a wild conjuncture. Probably, better one is gluten staying on the fat cells, but this would not apparently last long. $\endgroup$ – Léo Léopold Hertz 준영 Dec 2 '14 at 9:24
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Gluten is a protein. The textbook answer is that protein is not stored in fat cells.

Proteins are hydrolyzed into amino acids through digestion; some amino acids are ketogenic, and can contribute carbon towards fat biosynthesis. So some of the carbon that originates in gluten may be incorporated into a fatty acid. But the carbon has no 'memory' of its previous role in a gluten molecule, and could not act as gluten when the fat is subsequently oxidized.

One can imagine an undigested gluten molecule (or its peptide fragments) binding to the exterior of a fat cell, but there's no mechanism for it to get incorporated into fat as an intact protein.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for your answer! I think you are correct. Is there any other way how gluten can remain in the body, like in some compartments? I think this is possible in stomach itself for some hours. I approximate that enough-digested-gluten-for-symptoms remain in the body at least 5 hours or better said its effect. Of course, this is relatively for each individual. To know where gluten stays would help to think better the mechanisms of gluten interaction with the body. $\endgroup$ – Léo Léopold Hertz 준영 Dec 2 '14 at 9:23
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    $\begingroup$ "Is there any other way how gluten can remain in the body, like in some compartments?" I think so, as I allude to in my last sentence. It's an interesting enough question to stand on its own. A problem is that the question is structured as an appeal to ignorance...how is one to conclusively prove that there are no gluten-derived peptides that accumulate somewhre? Since the cellular receptors for gluten have been identified, I think this may be over-complicating things. $\endgroup$ – Ryan Dec 2 '14 at 12:54
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you very much for your excellent comment! It is true. There must also be other aspects in this fat burning where gluten may remain stored. $\endgroup$ – Léo Léopold Hertz 준영 Dec 2 '14 at 14:51

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