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Why is DNA called deoxyribonucleic acid and not something else? I get the nucleic acid part (because that's what DNA is made of) but what about the deoxyribo- part, especially the ribo- part. Maybe because DNA doesn't have oxygen, hence the "deoxy-"?

(Also, please tell me what is wrong with my question or whether there was a duplicate I didn't find so I can fix this question or delete it.)

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    $\begingroup$ Ribo- comes from ribose, which is a -ose(sugar). desoxy-ribose is a ribose with one oxygen missing. DNA uses desoxyribose while RNA uses ribose. $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Dec 11 '14 at 2:16
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    $\begingroup$ @Remi.b - perfect answer! Please convert to save the question from the closing frenzy. As never having received proper Latin training I sympathize with my fellow analphabetics :) $\endgroup$ – AliceD Dec 11 '14 at 3:08
  • $\begingroup$ It is not "the" perfect name. Someone just named it that way. Friedrich Miescher called it nuclein. In earlier times DNA was actually called desoxyribonucleic acid. If your question was about why "deoxyribo-" then I guess it is mentioned in wikipedia. Hence I am voting for closure. $\endgroup$ – WYSIWYG Dec 11 '14 at 13:12
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    $\begingroup$ @WYSIWYG - I commented 'perfect answer' not 'perfect name'. I think it's a valid question with a valid answer, provided the comment is converted. $\endgroup$ – AliceD Dec 11 '14 at 22:44
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    $\begingroup$ @ChrisStronks Oh I did not comment at your comment.. The "perfect" term is co-incidental $\endgroup$ – WYSIWYG Dec 12 '14 at 5:53
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The name is derived from the sugar which is bound to the base. For RNA it is Ribose (that why it is called ribonucleic acid) and for DNA it is Deoxyribose (hence the name deoxynucleic acid). The deoxyribose is missing an OH-group at positition 2 of the sugar ring, the name literally means "without oxygen". See the image below (from here) for further clarification:

enter image description here

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