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Usually adult organisms are more sophisticated than corresponding larva, i. e. frogs, mosquitoes, fish. Are there species where the opposite is true?

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    $\begingroup$ What do you mean by "advanced" and "sophisticated"? These are qualitative. $\endgroup$
    – kmm
    Commented Jun 13, 2012 at 2:23
  • $\begingroup$ Difficult to convey. Something sort of this quote from wikipedia about crocodiles: Crocodiles are among the more biologically complex reptiles despite their prehistoric look. Unlike other reptiles, a crocodile has a cerebral cortex, a four-chambered heart,and the functional equivalent of a diaphragm, by incorporating muscles used for aquatic locomotion into respiration (e.g. m. diaphragmaticus); $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 13, 2012 at 2:47
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    $\begingroup$ I guess I'd object to that characterization of crocs. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_biological_complexity $\endgroup$
    – kmm
    Commented Jun 13, 2012 at 4:05
  • $\begingroup$ Maybe, but the characterization is still useful in clarifying the meaning of "advanced". $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 13, 2012 at 5:36
  • $\begingroup$ I mean even if crocs are not as good as wiki describes them, the I would be more than happy had a larva got listed advancements. $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 13, 2012 at 5:40

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First let me agree with the commenters that your question doesn't really make sense. Nonetheless here's an example that you may find interesting. Arachnocampa are insects that spend almost their entire lives as larva. These larva spin silk trap lines which capture and poison prey. They can only live in windless places (wind will mix up the lines) so to lure insects into caves they glow. By contrast their imago forms are short-lived poor fliers which are unable to eat.

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