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  1. A ribosome is where amino acids are linked together by peptide bonds.
  2. A virus is NOT considered prokaryotic because it does not have a membrane.
  3. The nucleotide ATP is one of the most used energy molecules of a cell.
  4. Sugar phosphates are the type of lipid moved through the blood.
  5. A compound that lowers the pH is called an acid.
  6. The cell wall is a carbohydrate covering of all cells.
  7. The term cytosol is only applied to (blank) cells?
  8. An A-U base pair is part of the (blank) found in RNA.
  9. The major form of usable energy in animals is (what)?
  10. A polypeptide is a subunit of a what?

This is what I said 1. True 2.True 3. True 4. False (cholesterol) 5. True less than 7 acidic 6. False 7. Don't know 8.complementary 9. ATP 10. Protein or amino acid? Don't know

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome! Homework questions are accepted, but the PO should show signs of effort. We are not here to do it for you :) We are here to help. Please see the help center: biology.stackexchange.com/help/homework $\endgroup$ – AliceD Jan 22 '15 at 3:58
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1-6: OK;

  1. prokaryotes. Cytosol is the portion of cytoplasm which is devoid of any organelles, i.e., cytoplasm = cytosol + organelles. As prokaryotes don't have any organelles in their cytoplasm, they have only cytosol. So the answer would be prokaryotes (their cytoplasm consist of cytosol only). For a special case in eukaryotes see Crags answer below.

  2. Double strand;

  3. Glucose? (but not ATP, fat would also be a suitable alternative specially in animal living in cold regions thanks to @CRags);
  4. protein
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    $\begingroup$ You are very sweet. I can say that and get away with it because I'm an old lady. ') $\endgroup$ – anongoodnurse Jan 22 '15 at 4:55
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    $\begingroup$ Glucose and fat (lipid) too for 9 $\endgroup$ – One Face Jan 22 '15 at 11:45
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    $\begingroup$ @CRags - yes, but if you have to pick one it would be glucose guess? I think some of the questions are quite vague :) $\endgroup$ – AliceD Jan 22 '15 at 12:02
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    $\begingroup$ I think some questions have more than one answer! Lol, yes some are vague $\endgroup$ – One Face Jan 22 '15 at 12:04
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    $\begingroup$ @CRags - Great! If I could upvote your edited answer I would :) $\endgroup$ – AliceD Jan 22 '15 at 14:20
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A ribosome is where amino acids are linked together by peptide bonds.

True.

A virus is NOT considered prokaryotic because it does not have a membrane.

Some have capsules or envelopes, the latter of which are composed of the host cell's membrane. A virus would not be considered a prokaryote because it is not strictly alive -- prokaryotes do not have membrane-bound organelles, but they still produce the cellular machinery necessary to process nutrients and create proteins de novo without hijacking another cell. I would say False on this one, because the presence of a membrane doesn't define either viruses or prokaryotes, ergo the lack of one wouldn't either.

The nucleotide ATP is one of the most used energy molecules of a cell.

True. The other extremely common one is GTP, an ATP analogue.

Sugar phosphates are the type of lipid moved through the blood.

False. Sugars are phosphorylated to make sure they stay inside the cell and don't enter the blood (first thing that happens to glucose and fructose is phosphorylation in energy metabolism). They are also not lipids; they are not composed of long carbon chains of varying saturation.

A compound that lowers the pH is called an acid.

True. Since pH is a measurement of the available H+ ions in solution and acids contribute available H+ ions to the solution, the more acidic the compound the lower the pH will be.

The cell wall is a carbohydrate covering of all cells.

Generally speaking, True -- of plant, some bacteria, and some archae cells. Eukaryotes do not have cell walls. The cell walls of plants are composed of a carbohydrate (sugar) polymer called cellulose (aka - dietary fiber).

The term cytosol is only applied to (blank) cells?

Prokaryotic -- for reasons listed by others.

An A-U base pair is part of the (blank) found in RNA.

I'm a bit confused on this one. RNA is generally single-stranded, not double-stranded. It should not be base-pairing with itself unless specifically designed to. However, the Uracil is the RNA complement (my best guess) to Adenosine and replaces Thymine found in regular DNA.

The major form of usable energy in animals is (what)?

Either ATP or sugars/carbohydrates. Sugars are eventually used to regenerate ATP, and fats are broken down into sugars or further down-stream metabolic components of sugars.

A polypeptide is a subunit of a what?

A protein. Proteins are composed of many polypeptide strands which usually come together to compose discrete formations (alpha-helices or beta-sheets) that then eventually form proteins.

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    $\begingroup$ All monomeric proteins are composed of a single polypeptide. $\endgroup$ – canadianer Jan 22 '15 at 16:03
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    $\begingroup$ @canadianer -- Yeah, but the nomenclature conventions make "polypeptides" to usually 3-5 peptides chained together. Before is "dipeptide" and after can get up to "oligilopeptide" IIRC. $\endgroup$ – MCM Jan 22 '15 at 16:14
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    $\begingroup$ Nomenclature certainly varies; I generally go for a polypeptide being anything >20 whereas an oligopeptide is 2-20. 20 is entirely arbitrary, I just see it a lot in texts. Regardless of nomenclature, the point is that a monomeric protein is a single "strand" of amino acids. I'm not trying to nit-pick, it just seems misleading that you said many polypeptide strands come together to form alpha helices and beta sheets. $\endgroup$ – canadianer Jan 22 '15 at 20:11
  • $\begingroup$ Well explained +1 :) $\endgroup$ – AliceD Jan 22 '15 at 21:20
  • $\begingroup$ @canadianer -- I agree, the nomenclature is pretty arbitrary and can be misleading. Thanks for bringing it up. :-) $\endgroup$ – MCM Jan 22 '15 at 23:05
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Cytosol is the fluid portion of cytoplasm. All organelles are suspended in the cytosol but they do not form a part of cytosol. See here for a detailed explanation.

As Chris Stronks mentioned all cells have cytosol, but the red blood cells specifically do not have any organelles. The cytoplasm of RBC has only cytosol in which hemoglobin is suspended.

So even though all cells have cytosol, RBCs are a special case. That may be the answer to your question.

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    $\begingroup$ Cytosol is the soluble part of cytoplasm where minerals are dissolved. It excludes the cell organelles. Cytoplasm = cytosol + cell organelles. The cell organelles are suspended in cytosol, but the space occupied by them is not cytosol. google.co.in/… $\endgroup$ – One Face Jan 22 '15 at 13:48
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    $\begingroup$ @ChrisStronks when do you sleep? Lol, you always seem to be online giving great answers!!! $\endgroup$ – One Face Jan 22 '15 at 13:49
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    $\begingroup$ Aha! You may want to edit your answer :) One way or another +1 $\endgroup$ – AliceD Jan 22 '15 at 13:50
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    $\begingroup$ Thanks :) !! I sleep now and then though :) $\endgroup$ – AliceD Jan 22 '15 at 13:51
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    $\begingroup$ Have to say, this community is much more friendly compared to meta, thanks for all your support people! $\endgroup$ – One Face Jan 22 '15 at 13:56

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