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What are the differences between a benign tumor and an injury related swelling?

And can swellings due to injury turn into a benign tumor?

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  • $\begingroup$ Hi @chrisstronks, so what is a swelling? in another question someone told ne that thats kind of tumor. .. thanks for helping $\endgroup$ – Malic Of Sdom Jan 26 '15 at 11:33
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    $\begingroup$ There is too much confusion of terms here for the question to be answerable. $\endgroup$ – Mad Scientist Jan 26 '15 at 12:52
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    $\begingroup$ "Tumor," latin root Tumere is for swelling. If you're looking at a modern definition though, you have to consider the abnormal tissue growth. Yes, injuries may produce a thrombus, embolus, etc. however when you get injured and it swells, that isn't really a tumor. Injury swelling is just a biochemical response, but isn't characterized by cell proliferation. $\endgroup$ – CKM Jan 26 '15 at 22:37
  • $\begingroup$ @Kendall - This would be a fitting answer. I'll edit question and vote for reopening. Could you turn it into an answer? $\endgroup$ – AliceD Jan 27 '15 at 12:56
  • $\begingroup$ @MalicOfSdom - I removed malignancy here, as the step from benign to malignant may make the question too broad. If you are unhappy with the edit roll back. I am just trying to reopen this question. It covers your other closed swelling question as well. Perhaps turn benign vs malignant in a new one? $\endgroup$ – AliceD Jan 27 '15 at 13:07
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The term tumor is used in the medical definition of inflammation. However it just denotes a temporary swelling that goes down once the inflammation subsides. This swelling is due to edema (accumulation of fluid). You have to understand that in practice no one uses the term tumor to denote an inflammatory swelling. So the term “tumor” denoting edematous swelling is of historical significance only.

In modern practice the term tumor is used only to indicate abnormal growth of any kind. Either benign or malignant.


In pathology an inflammation is classically described as having the following features:

  • Tumor : Swelling
  • Dolor : Pain
  • Calor : Warmth
  • Rubor : Redness
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Replicated from comment section:

"Tumor," latin root Tumere is for swelling. If you're looking at a modern definition though, you have to consider the abnormal tissue growth. Yes, injuries may produce a thrombus, embolus, etc. however when you get injured and it swells, that isn't really a tumor. Injury swelling is just a biochemical response, but isn't characterized by cell proliferation.

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