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I was reading an article in nature communications, when I came across this sentence: "The ‘match’ rule was indicated by either a blue circle or a auditory upward sweep".So I tried googling what was an upward sweep, and came across this: "natural and complex vocalizations consist of basic elements such as upward sweeps, downward sweeps, constant frequency components, amplitude modulations..." I don't understand this. Can someone explain what is an upward sweep?

Here is the link to the article: http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2013/131128/ncomms3878/abs/ncomms3878.html,

But I think you have to pay to view the whole article, so here is another link that discusses the findings of the article:

http://www.uni-tuebingen.de/en/landingpage/newsfullview-landingpage/article/von-wegen-spatzenhirn-wie-nervenzellen-schlaues-verhalten-bei-rabenvoegeln-ermoeglichen.html

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    $\begingroup$ You should provide a link to the article. $\endgroup$ – fileunderwater Feb 20 '15 at 10:02
  • $\begingroup$ Yes definitely include the article link. It sounds to me that the authors used a sound that started at a low frequency and increased in pitch over time. $\endgroup$ – AliceD Feb 20 '15 at 10:40
  • $\begingroup$ It just means a sound that starts at a low frequency and goes up to higher frequency like a whistle sound. Perhaps someone can give you an example sound file and/or a spectrogram representation of it. $\endgroup$ – Memming Feb 20 '15 at 15:30
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Copied from my comment:

It just means a sound that starts at a low frequency and goes up to a higher frequency like a whistle sound. Perhaps someone can give you an example sound file and/or a spectrogram representation of it.

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