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Does anyone know of any research/examples on Hopeful Monsters in Plants?

I define Hopeful Monsters as organisms of a species that have macroevolutions to prompt new speciations. These macroevolutions being themselves, prompted by smaller gradual microevolutions in the species. See this paper for more details. I'm interested in a plant based example, or any good recent example, if plants can not suffice. Ideally research that is easily read and recent, and useful for arguing the existence of themselves?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by fileunderwater, AliceD, Chris, Nandor Poka, The Last Word Apr 16 '15 at 8:50

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Could you please add more context to your question? I'm not particularly familiar with the term Hopeful Monsters. $\endgroup$ – Nandor Poka Apr 15 '15 at 18:54
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    $\begingroup$ @poka.nandor I define Hopeful Monsters as organisms of a species that have macroevolutions to prompt new speciations. These macroevolutions being themselves, prompted by smaller gradual microevolutions in the species. I want a plant based example, or any good recent example, if plants can not suffice. $\endgroup$ – Ro Siv Apr 15 '15 at 19:06
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    $\begingroup$ I didn't the term "Hypoeful Monsters" before. From Wiki, the term "hopefull monsters" designate a concept (a hypothesis) and not an organism. In the same logic, the term "macroevolution" has a meaning that depends only on the observer and not on the underlying evolutionary processes. It means "evolution observed at a scale of separated gene pool". In any case, the term "macroevolution(s)" as a noun don't have any meaning to my knowledge. What do you mean by "macroevolutions"? Also, what do you mean by "microevolutions"? $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Apr 15 '15 at 19:11
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    $\begingroup$ I've edited these extra info along with the paper I found into your question, so it has all these details and don't get lost in comment section. You can roll back at any time if you wish. $\endgroup$ – Nandor Poka Apr 15 '15 at 19:13
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    $\begingroup$ Is your question "Can you give examples of plant lineages that underwent major mutations (such as chromosomal rearrangement or hybridization or change in ploidy level)?" or maybe it is something like "Can you give examples of plant lineages which fundamental niche has suddenly and drastically changed in response to a single (or few) mutations?" or stated differently is would be "Do you know examples in plants lineages of mutations that had a major impact on the ecology occupied by the species?" $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Apr 15 '15 at 19:15
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I am not sure what your question is but here is an example that may interest you.

  • The three sunflower species Helianthus anomalus, H. deserticola, and H. paradoxus are all of hybrid origin of the same two "parent species" (H. annuus and H. petiolaris).

Major ecological transitions in wild sunflowers facilitated by hybridization is a paper that will likely interest you. This paper has been written by L. Riesberg and colleagues. You may want to read through some of the work of L. Rieseberg (CactusWoman already linked one of his articles).

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One example of what you may consider to be a macroevolutionary change is a whole-genome-duplication, or polyploidy event. These are not uncommon in plants, and can promote speciation due to a reproductive barrier arising between the polyploid progeny and the diploid parents. You can find many papers about this topic, here is one from 2009: http://www.pnas.org/content/106/33/13875.short

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