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Myrmarachne plataleoides is a jumping spider that mimics the Kerengga or weaver ant (Oecophylla smaragdina) in both morphology and behaviour. However, the two sexes appear different:

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Myrmarachne plataleoides (Female)

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Myrmarachne plataleoides (Male)

Some links suggest that in dimorphic arthropods the females more exactly mimic the model. Is this true? If so, why would this sex difference exist?

Reference
Phyologenetics of mimicry

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    $\begingroup$ I slightly edited your question. However, the reference link is empty. I like this question a lot. +1 $\endgroup$ – AliceD May 25 '15 at 12:56
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    $\begingroup$ @AliceD:Sorry I just put insects there, LOL.....thank you for ur answer and edition. You did well $\endgroup$ – Jayachandran May 26 '15 at 4:12
  • $\begingroup$ All good! Thanks for the interesting question. $\endgroup$ – AliceD May 26 '15 at 4:34
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In sexually dimorphic ant-mimicking spiders, it depends on the specific species which sex resembles the ant most (Cushing, 2012).

In many cases of sexually dimorphic spider myrmecomorphs, the male is more mimetic than the female, such as in Corinnidae species and the genus Castianeira, Oonopidae and Antoonops.

Such sexual dimorphism may be adaptive if the sexes are exposed to different predation pressures. The spider's mimicry of noxious ant species yields protective benefit from predators who would avoid the ants. However, the mimicry often results in being more conspicuous in their color markings than related spider species that are more camouflaged. Hence, conspicuousness can be considered a cost of Batesian mimicry. A palatable species may be evolutionary maximizing its level of protection for the smallest cost (in terms of conspicuousness). Sexual dimorphism, in which the more active sex (which, in spiders, is typically the males) evolves mimetic resemblance to noxious ants, whereas the other sex remains relatively more concealed and camouflaged behaviorally and morphologically.

Reference
Cushing, psyche (2012); 151989: 1-24

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    $\begingroup$ Great reference - wonderful review of a very interesting association! $\endgroup$ – Oreotrephes May 25 '15 at 19:51
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    $\begingroup$ "whereas the other sex remains relatively more concealed and camouflaged behaviorally and morphologically." this points towards the female, but the female is the more closest resemblance. Then how could it be called as concealed and camouflaged. Do you mean the resemblance itself is camouflage ? $\endgroup$ – Jayachandran May 26 '15 at 4:48
  • $\begingroup$ @Jay, The author says that it is often the males that mimic the ants more closely, see the bolded-out text $\endgroup$ – AliceD May 26 '15 at 4:54
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    $\begingroup$ The male (Myrmarachne plataleoides) pictured have a pair of fangs, which make it differ from the female counter part. So here the female is the closest mimic and without these fangs the males would be too. I think these fangs are for display. $\endgroup$ – Jayachandran May 26 '15 at 5:16
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    $\begingroup$ the article you referred seems awesome. $\endgroup$ – Jayachandran May 26 '15 at 5:17

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