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I have electric fencing enclosing five acres, and moles always seem to tunnel in a straight line just under the electric fence - are they following a force field? Can that be?

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  • $\begingroup$ Interesting, they do not follow under the non-charged fences. Now to work out a way to tap this energy-field following and turn it into a death trap! There must be an electrical engineer who can figure out a 'better trap' in this situation. My place has hundreds of destructive moles and I would love to get rid of them all! $\endgroup$ – user16151 Jun 9 '15 at 21:50
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Rumor has it that some moles, such as the star nosed mole, have electroreceptors in their nose.

In 1993, Gould and colleagues proposed that the star-like proboscis had electroreceptors and that the mole was therefore able to sense the electrical field of its prey[24] prior to mechanical inspection by its appendages. Through behavioral experiments, they demonstrated that moles preferred an artificial worm with the simulated electrical field of a live earthworm to an identical arrangement without the electrical field.

They may thus be sensing the electrical field of the fence, and interpreting it as a nearby tasty worm.

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  • $\begingroup$ This seems to suggest an experiment. Put up more fences, some hooked up to electricity, some without, to act as controls. See if the fences with power attract more moles than fences without. If possible, adjust the voltage to each fence to see if stronger electric fields attract more moles. I know your standard fence charger doesn't let you adjust the voltage easily though, so it might take some effort to do that. $\endgroup$ – user137 Jun 9 '15 at 20:43

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