1
$\begingroup$

I am considering starting a treatment with Accutane(Isotretinoin), however I am not sure about what the effects on the brain are. Here are two studies that contradict each other:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11696672 The first one states that using an antagonist, they increased the rats' working memory. So logically, using the agonist (isotretinoin), it would cause a loss of working memory?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3360864/ Here they state that not only did isotretinoin not have negative effects, but it actually had positive effects.

I am more inclined to believe that it has negative effects, because most anecdotal evidence says that it makes patients feel "foggy" and "forgetful". Can anyone please enlighten me? What exacly does this stuff do to the brain and is it irreversible?

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Anyone think this might fit better on Health.SE? $\endgroup$ – anongoodnurse Jul 10 '15 at 1:23
  • $\begingroup$ "The first one states that using an antagonist, they increased the rats' working memory. So logically, using the agonist (isotretinoin), it would cause a loss of working memory?" Biology does not (have to) work like that on a phenotypic level. Agonitsts & Antagonits have opposite effects on the molecular level, even for a single cell any observable effects don't have to opposite of each other, the whole brain/organsim is a couple of more levels above that. $\endgroup$ – Nicolai Nov 14 '18 at 9:06
0
$\begingroup$

The second study did not even examine the pharmacological effects the drug had on the brain. The researchers noted depression scores tended to increase while on the drug, but not in significantly significant way. Keep in mind the drug is clearing a disfiguring condition, so this novelty may interfere with the ability for measures to detect psychiatric issues.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.