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In my school biology book, it is written that cuticle covers the epidermal cells in aerial parts of plants and root epidermis doesn't have cuticle. My question is that whether aerial roots, in plants like kalanchoe, also not have cuticle?

Do all kinds of roots not have cuticle?

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  • $\begingroup$ I don't believe that any class of root has cuticle tissue. The cuticle is special layer designed to work with the mechanical transport of leaves etc, which roots don't have. Different types of roots have different methods for absorbing and retaining water. $\endgroup$
    – Cynic Wild
    Jul 12, 2015 at 16:07

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According to this article, Selaginella aerial roots have a thick root cap that possesses a cuticle. Roots that have breached the soil do not have cuticles.

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Basically roots don't have cuticle while stem and leaves contain cuticle. As roots have to absorb water cuticle is not present in them

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