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I have no idea where this plant came from, or what it is. What I do know is its leaves are covered in little hairs, there's little thorns growing all over it, and just by rubbing its leaf it burns you and leaves a red mark as well as blisters. It stung my mother and I would like to know what it is so I can find a remedy.

enter image description here

larger image:

http://i1094.photobucket.com/albums/i449/cupcaketurtle1/20150714_225505_zpskr24gklq.jpg

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    $\begingroup$ It would help if you could add in what country you mother was stung by this plant. $\endgroup$ – bli Jul 15 '15 at 7:55
  • $\begingroup$ The littles hairs are called trichomes :) I had bad experience when visiting a tropical bushy area. If you don't mind, could you please share where (roughly the region and city) your mother came into to contact with this plant? $\endgroup$ – bonCodigo Jul 15 '15 at 8:07
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    $\begingroup$ Looks like a member of Urticaceae. $\endgroup$ – Always Confused Aug 28 '16 at 19:23
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I think it is a common stinging nettle, Urtica dioica. It is a native to Europe, Asia, northern Africa, and western North America and is the best-known member of the nettle genus Urtica. As commented by others, your geographical location would be helpful to obtain a more accurate identification.

Like other stinging nettles, it is unpleasant to the touch, but harmless. Just be patient. The redness and burning/itching will disappear. If the pain gets serious or other complaints arise, go to your GP.

stinging nettle
Stinging nettle. Source: Health Direct.

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It's a nettle (genus Urtica).

The one on your photo really looks like the one I'm used to see in France: Urtica dioica.

I read in herbal lore books that the sting of the nettle could be appeased by rubbing it with Plantago leafs. But that might just be placebo effect. See also this section of the wikipedia page.

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    $\begingroup$ Common folklore where I live is to sooth the irritation by rubbing the affected area with the leaves of Dock (Rumex obtusifolius) - which often grow near nettles. As a child I recall it being effective (though some of that was probably psychological reassurance). $\endgroup$ – RedGrittyBrick Jul 15 '15 at 10:05

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