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I usually would search for myself, but I need to be super sure about the identification because I need to know if I need to get an exterminator in here or not. (I think it might be a giant house spider, but don't let me influence your analysis.)

So I live in the northern part of Ireland (About 40 minutes from Derry Northern Ireland over in County Donegal) and I went to my bathroom to a VERY fun surprise this morning. It was this wonderful spider in my bathroom. For reference, the lip of the glasses it is depicted in are 8 - 8.5 cm in diameter.

The missing leg was not my fault either, I was very gentle with the spider and released it outside post photo-shoot. (Warning: these are macro shots of the said spider)


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More high resolution photos available on my Flickr (SolarLunix).

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    $\begingroup$ "I live in the northern part of Ireland and I went to my bathroom" - assuming the bathroom is within walking distance of the house, its the northern region of Ireland ;P $\endgroup$ – rg255 Jul 15 '15 at 9:18
  • $\begingroup$ An image from the top in good light would help, maybe a wolf spider $\endgroup$ – rg255 Jul 15 '15 at 9:20
  • $\begingroup$ @rg255 That was the best I could do given the circumstances and the need to get it outside before my hubby woke up and freaked out. $\endgroup$ – SolarLunix Jul 15 '15 at 9:21
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Looks like a house spider (Tegenaria domestica)

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ I just love these to-the-point answers +1 $\endgroup$ – AliceD Jul 15 '15 at 13:30
  • $\begingroup$ This is close, but not quite correct $\endgroup$ – JimN Apr 10 at 21:19
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The images in the question are of a giant house spider, as hypothesized in the question. (Eratigena duellica/atrica/saeva). These (along with the hobo spider, Eratigena agrestis) do not have any banding or annulations in their legs (dark/light stripes/rings).

The spider in the other answer of Tegenaria domestica do (always) exhibit leg banding. So, it is not the spider in question.

Both Eratigena and Tegenaria are in the funnel weaver family.

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