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I read article about alcohol harm where written that child may bear with birth defect cause mother used to drink alcohol 10 years ago so egg cell stay damages that long.

I don't believe that human egg cell wait for such long time until activated.

How long human egg cell grow up until sperm fuse it?

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    $\begingroup$ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovarian_follicle Eggs are paused in their development until released during the menstrual cycle. $\endgroup$ – March Ho Aug 15 '15 at 11:01
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for suggestion! It is unclear from wikipedia article (I am not biologist) but as I understand reading that number of Ovarian follicle from beginning of puberty is limited (near 300'000 - 400'000) and decreased. So I may say that human egg cell live as long as human age except childhood development time. $\endgroup$ – gavenkoa Aug 15 '15 at 11:23
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    $\begingroup$ @gavenkoa any article that make "scientific" claims that you read that is not peer-reviewed or does not accurately reference peer-reviewed findings is at best suspect... Even articles in a source as respected as The New York Times can and do often write their articles base solely on the abstract. The problem is that abstracts to journal articles don't always tell the complete picture of the study which can lead to false assumptions that end up as articles in popular publications. $\endgroup$ – AMR Aug 17 '15 at 13:28
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    $\begingroup$ Fetal Alcohol Syndrome tends to affect the developmental process of the fetus and is not associated with actual genetic change. Ethanol is not a known mutagen, so it is not likely that it has an effect on oocytes. Oocytes are also mitotically inactive, so short of ionizing radiation, it isn't likely that any change will be made to the chromosomes of the oocytes. It is very possible that toxins such as chemotherapeutic and possibly ethanol (though unlikely) could damage or destroy oocytes, but this would likely only affect the woman's fertility and not the outcome of a pregnancy. $\endgroup$ – AMR Aug 17 '15 at 13:39
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How long human egg cell grow up until sperm fuse it?

Ovules are made while the female is still in the uterus of her mother. The ovules (in the form of ovarian follicles) are kept in the ovaries for a long time, and just a month before leaving the ovary (ovulation), the ovarian follicle (and the future ovule) gain in size. In other words, the ovules are slightly older than the age (counting from birth/labour) than the person carrying them. You'll find more information on wikipedia > ovule > ovule Development, oogenesis, and ovarian follicle.

Does it address your interest about alcohol consumption?

Now, I don't think this question/answer address your interest about alcohol consumption. Whether or not the ovule is create by a division that happen just a day before ovulation or many years earlier doesn't change anything to the fact that this ovule has experienced alcohol consumption (either directly or in the lineage) before.

Where to ask the question that I suspect interest you the most

If you want to question the article you read about alcohol consumption, the best you could do is to go on Skeptics.SE, link the article, quote something from the article and ask "is it true?"

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  • $\begingroup$ Please consider editing your answer. It is incomplete from the perspective of human developmental biology. Also, I would personally question the use of "belly" over uterus on a forum on biology. $\endgroup$ – AMR Aug 17 '15 at 13:52
  • $\begingroup$ @AMR I changed "belly" into "uterus" (don't think it is quite a big deal but I guess it indeed look better this way). I realize the answer is a bit weak but it boils down to 1) the fact that the question implicitly assume a moment when an ovule is "born" which is quite an unclear concept and 2) wiki says it all. Would you think it is worth making a full description of oogenesis on this post? $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Aug 17 '15 at 14:05
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    $\begingroup$ No, but then don't go into partial details. Say, unlike males who do not produce sperm until puberty, and then produce them constantly for the rest of their lives, human females are born with their full complement of sex cells, which are, for the most part dormant until ovulation. You could also explain that a toxin that does not cause mutagenesis would at worst kill the cell before it could be fertilized, so it is unlikely that alcohol use outside of pregnancy would pose a risk to fetal development. It is possible that there could be diminished fertility, but that would require citation. $\endgroup$ – AMR Aug 17 '15 at 14:24
  • $\begingroup$ I wouldn't say that I am very proud of the formulation of my answer (and globally, I realize that I am not a great writer and english is not my mother tongue which probably doesn't quite help). If you don't have anything to say about the content but only about the right choice of details (and about the formulation), maybe the best is just to make your own answer, with your own formulation. Thanks for the suggestions though. $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Aug 17 '15 at 14:35
  • $\begingroup$ I am suggesting that an answer has a higher standard than a comment on SE sites. I gave the response I wanted to give in the comments as I did not want to get into the detail or citation necessary to answer properly. While you may not respect the OPs question or its validity for the forum, you need to remember that SE Q&A on topics rank highly on Google search, so others with the same question will be directed here. Give an answer that is representative of your training as a scientist, or leave a comment to point OP to further research. The answer represents you as much as the OPs question. $\endgroup$ – AMR Aug 17 '15 at 15:57

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