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Some patient who have low White blood cells need WBC Transfusion do resist infections. What is interesting, doesn't transfused WBCs cause temporary autoimmune disease ? Like recognising patients organs as foreign ? just like in the organ transplantation. Regards.

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  • $\begingroup$ I do not think that the white blood cells received in a whole blood transfusion would be enough to cause a problem, as most WBCs are only raised during an active infection, so would likely be too low to cause problems. The WBCs are likely killed off soon after the transfusion. The problem with organ transplants is that the hosts immune system attack the foreign cells, not the other way around... Also it is funny answering this question as I have a friend named Armin who has a PhD in Immunology... I almost feel like it is a trap. $\endgroup$ – AMR Aug 30 '15 at 18:24
  • $\begingroup$ cancer.org/treatment/treatmentsandsideeffects/treatmenttypes/… I don't think they are used much anymore, as there efficacy was questionable, but it does appear they had the ability to produce a fever in the host. $\endgroup$ – AMR Aug 30 '15 at 18:30
  • $\begingroup$ @AMR Great explanations. I have found out, a guy in this link states that "There is also a process called transfusion-associated graft versus host disease in which the donor white blood cells will attack the host cells; this mainly occurs in immune-compromised individuals" biology.stackexchange.com/a/10126/17583 Wiki en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… $\endgroup$ – ARMIN Aug 30 '15 at 19:53

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