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Is there a way to perform non-specific PCR amplification for the purpose of amplifying every piece of DNA present?

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  • $\begingroup$ what is the source of DNA? If minor variation is not a problem, then you can just grind more tissue/culture volume to extract more DNA. All cells in your body and most cells in cultures have (almost) the same DNA $\endgroup$ – Oct18 is day of silence on SE Aug 30 '15 at 23:15
  • $\begingroup$ actually, that is how RNAseq works. A lot of DNA is produced from RNA, then fragments of DNA have adapters (know short sequences) added to its' ends, and then those DNA fragments are amplified with PCR $\endgroup$ – Oct18 is day of silence on SE Aug 30 '15 at 23:18
  • $\begingroup$ Are you asking about whole genome amplification? $\endgroup$ – WYSIWYG Aug 31 '15 at 5:08
  • $\begingroup$ Ah, thank you, that was what I was looking for. $\endgroup$ – user1939991 Aug 31 '15 at 5:11
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In short; Theoretically yes.

In practicallity no.

I agree with this opinion.

But, there are some methods to do so. Ligating both ends with specific tags to amplify DNA fragments with the tag specific primer set. If you have different length of DNA fragments in original sample, PCR products could be biased.

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In short; Theoretically yes.

In practicallity no.

Non-specific PCR require random primers to anneal to a target sequence to initiate replication during PCR. Theoretically this should anneal to every combination of bases and therefore allow the amplification of all DNA (or at least in a fragmented form).

Practically, all the primer combinations will have different primer annealling temperatures due to the differential base composition, making the amplification of fragmentation inconsistent, and in others down-right impossible.

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