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I've got a project where we collect leaves, classify them, etc. There are some required classifications. One of the requirements is to get a doubly-compound leaf. What are some trees that are doubly-compound? Please help! I have Hickory, but that's just compound I think.

Edit: I did try googling, but it's hard for me to know what's available in my region.

From Comments: I live in Tennessee, U.S.

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  • $\begingroup$ Where in the world are you? What kind of trees/plants do you have access to? $\endgroup$ – Resonating Oct 27 '15 at 21:29
  • $\begingroup$ I live in Tennessee. $\endgroup$ – biologyflair Oct 27 '15 at 21:46
  • $\begingroup$ Hickories are not doubly compound (AKA bipinnate). They are just (once) compound leaves as you guessed. $\endgroup$ – theforestecologist Jan 21 '16 at 18:35
  • $\begingroup$ For the future, you can try Weakley's flora app "FloraQuest". You can search for trees based on a dichotomous key and fortunately It'll automatically narrow your choices so you can only see local plants. Though this won't give you a list, it'll train you to use a valuable tool while searching for your own answers. (Note: it comes with a visual glossary of terms :D) $\endgroup$ – theforestecologist Jan 27 '16 at 22:10
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Albizia julibrissin (Persian silk tree) is doubly compound (AKA bipinnate) and has a conspicuous pink/white fluffy flower. This tree is an Asian native, but it's a commonly cultivated (and equally commonly escaped) plant in the U. S. You should be able to find it in numerous locations. Look in yards and along roads.

Albizia julibrissin http://www.missouriplants.com/Pinkalt/Albizia_julibrissin_plant.jpg

For native species: Gleditsia triacanthos (honeylocust) is a fairly widespread (though uncommon) example of bipinnate leaves. Here is an image from Will Cook's wonderful website:

Gleditsia triacanthos

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honeylocust (Gleditsia triacanthos)

waterlocust (Gleditsia aquatica)

Texas redbud (Cercis reniformis)

Kentucky Coffee Tree (Gymnocladius dioica)

A simple Google search will probably turn up many more examples.

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  • $\begingroup$ Please could you add some supporting scientific material that reinforces your answer and allows further reading. $\endgroup$ – rg255 Mar 8 '16 at 7:36
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Many ferns have multiply-compound leaves

Take the one in this image, for instance:

enter image description here

That structure is one doubly-compound leaf.

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Most plants of the caesalpinioideae subfamily of the leguminosae family are bipinnate, i.e., doubly compound. The best, and perhaps the most easily accesible one for you would have to be tamarind.

Tamarind leaves

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