2
$\begingroup$

Instead of creating protein sequences, could that stepped be skipped and just have B-cells created to manufacture a particular type of immunity?

$\endgroup$

closed as unclear what you're asking by AliceD, March Ho, James, kmm, rg255 Nov 12 '15 at 7:50

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Are you after clonal antibodies? $\endgroup$ – AliceD Oct 29 '15 at 11:11
  • $\begingroup$ @AliceD That isn't what they are after. They want to gene edit B-cell receptors to recognize specific pathogens. $\endgroup$ – AMR Oct 29 '15 at 15:52
  • $\begingroup$ Please clarify your question with sufficient background information otherwise it is likely to get closed. $\endgroup$ – WYSIWYG Oct 30 '15 at 5:11
2
$\begingroup$

We aren't there yet.

There is a complex interplay between antigen recognition, presentation, and activation that would have to be worked out. You would also need to engineer the corresponding T-Cell which could recognize the antigen, become activated, which means you also need to develop a dendritic cell that can present to the T-cells, so that they could then go on to activate the B-Cells. Doing this in vitro would be a challenge.

You are actually asking to design highly specific receptors, and protein engineering then sequencing back to a genome would be difficult to do.

If you tried taking a known antibody, you would need to track down the actual B-Cell that produces it, due to somatic hypermutation creating a unique DNA sequence, which leads to the specificity that increases the affinity of antibodies for their ligands. I guess if you did it with germ free mice, you might have a shot at isolating their B-Cells and then finding out the gene sequence. Not impossible, in my opinion, but very difficult at this point.

The closest thing I have heard of so far is the work that is being done in Dr. Carl June's lab. They are working on taking cytotoxic T-Cells, and recombining their receptor DNA so that they can then recognize a patient's tumor and kill the cancer cells, but that is a bit different than what you are asking.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.