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I have been thinking about how adrenaline increases blood sugar levels, but have not been able to find an answer to the target cells. Does it affect the hepatocytes and muscle cells, like glycogen?

Thank you in advance :)

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  • $\begingroup$ look at the answer for the cAMP question you asked - you already seem to know the answer... biology.stackexchange.com/questions/41084/… $\endgroup$ – Vance L Albaugh Dec 3 '15 at 17:06
  • $\begingroup$ epinephrine (adrenaline) has many target cells though - and the effects are many - remember each of the cells that has adrenergic receptors (that adrenaline signals through) can have different effects depending on the cell type $\endgroup$ – Vance L Albaugh Dec 3 '15 at 17:07
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Epinephrine is a hormone that works systemically and will activate any and all cells that express a hormone receptor with specificity for epinephrine.

As stated in the wikipedia article "It plays an important role in the fight-or-flight response by increasing blood flow to muscles, output of the heart, pupil dilation, and blood sugar. Epinephrine does this by its effects on alpha and beta receptors."

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Epinephrine (also known as adrenaline) is produced by the adrenal glands and stimulates α- and β-adrenergic receptors. And is responsible for various physiological responses, depending on the type of receptor and the tissue to which this hormone binds.

Epinephrine increase blood glucose level by stimulating glycogenolysis. This hormone binds to β2 adrenergic receptors present on hepatocytes and skeletal muscle cells and promote the glycogen breakdown.

(Via: https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/beta-adrenergic-receptor)

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(Image Source: http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/bb450/fall14/stryer7/21/figure_21_16.jpg)

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