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My textbook wrote that the reason why acrosomal enzymes are so securely contained within the sperm (thus needing capacitation to facilitate their release) is to prevent any premature release in the male reproductive tract. If they were released, they would start digesting the male organs. However, wouldn’t this apply in the female reproductive tract too, once capacitation has occurred? Does the female reproductive tract have some sort of protection against this? (I’m assuming that the sperm has been capacitated but has not fertilized the egg yet.)

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The acrosome reaction does not take place till the sperm reaches the zone pellucida of the ovum, which causes the acrosome to rupture. Thus the female reproductive tract does not get exposed to the enzymes.

Links: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acrosome_reaction

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