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Is there are any books or papers on the topic of visual differences(analyzing H&E microscopy) of high grade cancer cells vs low grade cancer cells vs non-cancer cells?

In particular, I am trying to measure how much of genome was altered by analyzing images.

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    $\begingroup$ That seems like a substantial undertaking. How familiar are you with histopathology generally? The identification and grading of tumors is a large topic in histopathology, about which a good deal has been written (to my knowledge, none on your question specifically, but I am by no means an expert in pathology). Are you looking at a particular type of neoplasm? $\endgroup$
    – Hans
    Dec 17, 2015 at 19:45
  • $\begingroup$ @Hans you are absolutely right, this is a very challenging problem. I am CS major and have some datasets and interesting algorithms that I am going to apply, but first I wanted to get at least a little bit of understanding of the field. I read some articles about histopathology and this was useful and insightful, but I decided to ask this here in case anyone can give me some pointers to more relevant books on this topic. I am looking at a prostate cancer, but I believe general principles are the same -- I read that some mutated cells change shape\function\invade tissues and blood vessels\etc $\endgroup$ Dec 17, 2015 at 20:08
  • $\begingroup$ Maybe I am misinterpreting your question. Tumor grading would be done histologically. To determine alterations to the genome itself, I would think that the only thing you could do visually is karyotyping. You could get a sense of translocations, loss of chromosomes, indels, etc. Otherwise you would likely need to do sequencing. $\endgroup$
    – AMR
    Dec 17, 2015 at 21:08

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Histologic diagnosis of tumors is made using the so-called WHO blue books.

Different tumors show different patterns of cellular and tissual aberrations.

On h&e karyorrexis and pyknosis are examples histological markers of nuclear aberration.

A recent paper reviews the salient visual and subvisual morphological changes of cancer nuclei and their possible cause or etiology and significance.

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