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Link here to what I mean by 'opaque' colouration on the insect, the colour intensity remains constant despite changes in light intensity and angle (not shown by the picture but the moth exhibits this in the field). This is different to 'metallic' colouration on other moths like the Forester moth (image here), where the colour intensity changes with light angle and intensity.

Through reading R.F. Chapman's book ('The Insects: Structure and Function'), I know that metallic colours are caused by interference patterns produced by the micro structure of the scales, the book says this is how most higher frequency colours are produced, including green in this category. Obviously I've looked for pigments that could give this colour but I haven't found anything that is produced in insects.

So my question is: Is there a pigment that gives this colour in the insect and if so, what is it?

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According to this paper, green pigments are found in lepidoptera. The study focused on Geometridae, and found that the primary pigment in emerald moths, such as Hemistola chrysoprasaria is also found as secondary pigment in Pseudoips prasinana. The authors dubbed the substance 'Geoverdin' and suggest it may be a derivative of chlorophyll consumed during the larval stage. I cannot find any further studies mentioning 'geoverdin' or its chemical identity.

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