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Many of these little snails suddenly appeared in our aquarium from nowhere. I suspect that some snail eggs hitched a ride with some recently purchased plants.

Can anyone identify the species? I am not having any luck with googling.

The photos show a baby snail of about 2-3 mm in size. The shell is asymmetric, with one side looking completely flat (or concave).

These are not pond snails. We also have (uninvited) pond snails, but pond snails look different even when as small as these. This new species has a lighter colour than pond snails, a more transparent shell of a different shape, and moves slower.

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  • $\begingroup$ You've got me stumped. Are all the little ones this shape? Sort of leaning towards some sort of ramshorn or similar but definitely not sure. You may need to wait until they mature some to get a better idea. The only clear adult snail I can think of is a cave one found a few years ago. I'll bet the shell on this gets some color as it ages. $\endgroup$ – Jestep Jan 27 '16 at 23:29
  • $\begingroup$ @Jestep Yes, all of these have the exact same shape, and they all have the exact same size, which is why I think that they hatched from eggs at the same time. The ramshorn photos I found appear to show a more symmetric shell. I think that the reason why I cannot find anything that looks like this online is that they will change in appearance as they grow up. $\endgroup$ – Szabolcs Jan 27 '16 at 23:33
  • $\begingroup$ I would post the images in some of the aquatic forums. These close ups are great by the way. aquaticplantcentral.com is a good one, there are some others as well. $\endgroup$ – Jestep Jan 29 '16 at 21:13
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These are a kind of ramshorn snail, as Jestep correctly guessed. Now they are grown up and they are clearly identifiable as ramshorn.

I will post photos of adults when I get the opportunity.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yes but Ramshorn is not an identification. What's the Latin scientific name? $\endgroup$ – Quidam Oct 31 '18 at 22:49
  • $\begingroup$ Can you please pray the photos of the adults you mentioned? Thanks. $\endgroup$ – Joselin Jocklingson Mar 23 at 17:55

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