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Introns are sections of noncoding DNA that separate exons within a gene locus. However, between different gene loci, I also would assume there to be noncoding regions of DNA. What are these regions called? (And if my assumption is wrong, then please correct me.)

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These regions, if unannotated, are simply called intergenic regions.

Sometimes, if a large section of chromatin is regulated by an enhancer/silencer/locus control element, then there are boundary elements that demarcate this chromatin region and prevent the spread of the chromatin state to neighbouring regions.

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It would be valid to call them "intergenic regions", but this is just another way of saying that they are the regions between genes. I don't think you can do much more because they are not homogenous in nature. Some may be short and perhaps lack any other function than that described by @WYSIWYG, others may be very long and have enhancers and regulatory elements for proximal or distal genes, simple repeated sequences, pseudogenes, replication origins etc. etc.

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