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Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Clostridium perfringens all produce hyaluronidase. Each of these bacteria are pathogens (use hyaluronidase as a virulence factor to destroy the polysaccharide that holds animal cells together, making it easier for the pathogen to spread through the tissues of the host organism)

The role of hyaluronidases in cancer is controversial, however there is substantial evidence of increased hyaluronidase activity in malignancies.

We know, human sperm also produces hyaluronidase (for penetration of ovum), So what would happen if sperm enters blood (Like:via cuts or wounds on genitals)?

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  • $\begingroup$ Ciliary Dysentery(Balantidiasis) is caused by Balantidium coli(ciliated protozoan) which causes ulcers in colon and invades mucous membrane by secreting "Hyaluronidase" $\endgroup$ – Swastik Mar 13 '16 at 6:22
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    $\begingroup$ Not much really, blood would be a really hostile environment for sperm. And they would get targeted by the immune system rather quickly. Fertilization of oocyte by sperm is a very specific process, sperm would not be able to "drill" through any type of cells. $\endgroup$ – Maljam Mar 13 '16 at 6:22
  • $\begingroup$ Would there be any effect in body after hyaluronidase is secreted by sperm? You can guess it by examples given by me.@Maljam $\endgroup$ – Swastik Mar 13 '16 at 6:26
  • $\begingroup$ could you link the evidence to your claim The role of hyaluronidases in cancer is controversial, however there is substantial evidence of increased hyaluronidase activity in malignancies.? $\endgroup$ – Ebbinghaus Mar 13 '16 at 6:28
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    $\begingroup$ The problem with bacteria in tissues is that they can multiply, causing more damage. A sperm can't multiply. It's effect would be negligible. $\endgroup$ – anongoodnurse Mar 13 '16 at 15:16

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