14
$\begingroup$

The skull was found on a beach on the Sechelt inlet on Canada's pacific coast. A marine environment. enter image description here

enter image description here

What species is this skull from?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ There's no question? $\endgroup$ – White Fang Mar 16 '16 at 3:57
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ It is a species identification question. I is obvious enough to not a fully phrased question. $\endgroup$ – Remi.b Mar 16 '16 at 4:49
  • $\begingroup$ Can you provide a side view picture? It could be a couple things, but seeing the width of the zygomatic arches (~eye sockets) would be helpful. $\endgroup$ – Forest Mar 16 '16 at 19:57
  • $\begingroup$ The z arches are 13 cm wide. Just trying to figure out how to load another picture. $\endgroup$ – Rusty biologist Mar 16 '16 at 20:47
4
$\begingroup$

We found a very similar skull on a beach near Richardson Bay, Lasqueti BC. Decided it was a seal skull (locals agreed) See harbor seal skull: http://www.skullsunlimited.com/record_species.php?id=4726enter image description hereenter image description hereenter image description here

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

I know guessing is frowned upon but given the small size of the skull and the relatively small inlet you've cited as a location, my best guess is it's the back half of a dolphin's skull. Probably Pacific White-Sided Dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens)

Compare:

Sorry for the watermark. From Skulls Unlimited enter image description here

^ The cheek-bones look pretty similar, but the snout and the pit on the side that superficially resembles an eye orbit have been broken off or caved in on your sample.

From cetacea.ca

enter image description here

^ I can't find pictures of the underside of a skull without the mandible, but the hole in the bottom of yours might match the one on the very far right here, though I'm not sure about the bulges on the underside.

I can't be sure if its a complete match but my best proposal is that it's a juvenile dolphin skull.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @SabelGear can you add some links for those pictures? $\endgroup$ – Vance L Albaugh Mar 16 '16 at 19:55
  • $\begingroup$ Added links to original pages. Sorry, didn't realize Stack hosted through imgur. $\endgroup$ – SableGear Mar 16 '16 at 20:02
  • $\begingroup$ the zygomatic is all wrong for a cetacean, far to wide and robust, and the orbits are in completely different place, even the auditory bulla are in the wrong place. $\endgroup$ – John Aug 12 '17 at 3:49
1
$\begingroup$

I agree with Mark it is a seal, specifically the rear half of the skull.

That low flat profile of the skull combines with with a wide robust zygomatic is indicative of seals. The triangular and yet flat sagittal crest is also a dead giveaway. The orbits are high, large, poorly defined, and deeply recessed with only a narrow band between them that is indicative of seals. Check out a these seal skulls for comparison.

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

In the last one you can even see how you end up with only the rear portion as you do, as the rest is only weakly attached and the zygomatics are weakly fused at the center and tends to separate as well. I can't tell you the species but you definitely have a seal.

$\endgroup$
-1
$\begingroup$

"Dwarf Sperm Whale" Scientific name: Kogia sima

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Please provide a citation or 2 and additional information. Right now this looks like a guess, not an answer. $\endgroup$ – theforestecologist Mar 16 '16 at 13:00
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Skull is not 'peaked' as seems typical of cetaceans. Skull has no eye socket 'dents' . Assumed eye sockets are forward facing and close together. $\endgroup$ – Rusty biologist Mar 16 '16 at 20:53

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.