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I'm a bit confused what prevents our organs from not collapsing into a heap or putting pressure on each other. I have a 3D anatomy app and have been studying the relationship between the organs. According to the models, the organs are remarkably complementary in geometry and compact, but this still doesn't explain what prevents gravity from distorting them or squishing them.

My Question

What keeps organs suspended in the body?

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    $\begingroup$ Organs have internal structure to support them, and are attached to other organs and the various linings of the compartments in which they reside. They have many blood and lymph vessels going in and out of them as well. They do move somewhat with gravity, as the simple (for most people) experiment of standing on your head or laying backwards off an elevated surface will tell you. The body has evolved to contain them in a certain, not terribly flexible volume, so there's not much room for them to move around. $\endgroup$ – MattDMo Mar 22 '16 at 1:40
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Most of the organs are attached to the abdominal wall by a fold of peritonium called mesentary. Mesentary is a membranous tissue arising from the posterior wall of the peritoneal cavity and is responsible for keeping the organs at their designated places.Mesentary wiki

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