0
$\begingroup$

A and B antigens which have the potential to cause agglutination in certain cases are called agglutinogens. But, as far as I know, H antigen cannot give rise to agglutination. So can it be said that H antigen also is an agglutinogen?

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

H antigen is a precursor for A and B antigens, and hh (recessive) individuals do not express this antigen. See Bombay blood group. This is an example of epistasis. Since H antigen is present in all A,B,AB and O blood groups, transfusion from any of these to an hh individual will cause a haemolytic reaction. Anti-H antibodies are agglutinins and have been referred to as agglutinins in the scientific literature.

The fairly strong anti-H agglutinins present in 'Bombay' and 'para-Bombay' individuals (see 5.5.6) are generally accompanied by anti-A and anti-B, neither of which can be separated from the anti-H specific antibodies.


Schenkel-Brunner, Helmut. Human blood groups: chemical and biochemical basis of antigen specificity. Springer Science & Business Media, 2000. e-Book ISBN: 978-3-7091-6294-1

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.