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I've just read the news that a "new generation" brain scanner is under development. I wonder whether they can detect chronic traumatic encephalopathy. I haven't been able to find the paper about these new brain scanners.

So is it possible to detect CTE (during life of the patient, i.e. non post mortem) with this new device, and if not, is there any chance it will be possible in the future?

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I do not know the details of the innovation, but it's based on MEG. MEG is a complementary technique similar to EEG, sesitive to magnetic fields instead of electrical fields (hence the 'M' in place of the 'E'). It is used to read population brain activity in real time, and is less useful as a tool to assess structural changes. MEG is currently mainly used for research purpose, and I don't see this innovation changing that. CTE could manifest in longer conduction delays or disruption of communication, but given that MEG can only access certain areas of the brain, it is probably not going to be very useful in general. I can imagine it being useful for some very specific CTE cases.

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