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I'm reading now the Campbell biology book (10th), and on page 1063 is written:

In all but the simplest animals, specialized populations of neurons handle each stage of information processing.

What does it mean "specialized populations of neurons"? I always knew that there is a population in biological hierarchy of creatures rather than the cells which assemble the creatures.

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    $\begingroup$ As in the occipital lobe handling vision processing, the prefrontal lobe intiating motor activities, etc... $\endgroup$ – One Face Mar 27 '16 at 16:48
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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about English language usage, not biological terminology. $\endgroup$ – MattDMo Mar 30 '16 at 20:21
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It's just a specialized group of neurons. You can call a group of cells a population of cells. They are specialized because those particular neurons carry out a specific function.

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