1
$\begingroup$

I noticed that both of them are used in many scientific papers. Are these two terms, or can they be used interchangeably?

$\endgroup$
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic $\endgroup$ – rg255 Apr 2 '16 at 16:39
  • $\begingroup$ @rg255 Why is this off topic? It seems to be a valid terminology question. $\endgroup$ – March Ho Apr 4 '16 at 3:10
  • $\begingroup$ Because it's an English language problem as far as I cam tell $\endgroup$ – rg255 Apr 4 '16 at 5:41
  • $\begingroup$ also possibly duplicate biology.stackexchange.com/questions/29857/… $\endgroup$ – rg255 Apr 4 '16 at 12:24
1
$\begingroup$

Searching Google Scholar for cell confluence returns 239000 hits, while searching for cell confluency returns 75000 hits.

A look at the context in which they are used supports my gut feel, which is that

1: "confluence" should be used in contexts of "% confluence"

2: "confluency" should be used in contexts where you describe high or low levels of confluency.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.