1
$\begingroup$

I have had a few biochemistry courses, but I still feel confused and a bit scared each time they try to explain and apply enzyme kinetics or even chemometrics in different situation during class. On our last lecture we had kinetics regarding:

  • Pingpong reactions (with two substrates A, B):

    $V_0 = \dfrac{K_{cat}[E]* [A][B]}{K_m^B [A] * [B] * [A][B]} $

  • General reactions (with two substrates A, B):

    $V_0 = \dfrac{K_{cat}[E]* [A][B]}{K_m^B [A] * K_s^A * [B] * [A][B]} $

And we also had something about analyzing the "principle component" in multivariate data, from enzyme kinetic measurements (as effect of e.g. pH of temperature).

I really don't understand this, or how I would apply this - or analyze my data if I have two substrates.

Question: In general, is there a good web site which goes beyond the normal Michaelis menten analysis, or a very good book which explains both the basic and more complex scenarios regarding analysis/application of enzyme kinetics for biochemists?

$\endgroup$
2
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Is there a textbook for your course? If so, which one? At the undergraduate level, Voet & Voet is the most comprehensive for my money (and that is a lot of money). However, for detailed discussion of kinetic mechanisms, like Dan Koshland's ping-pong model, you probably need a book focusing exclusively on enzyme kinetics (not a general textbook) $\endgroup$
    – mdperry
    Apr 21, 2016 at 11:51
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ there is no textbook, just the teacher drawing on the board. Its okay to memorize exactly what they say, and then just paste it in on an exam.. but i would really like to understand this. Thank you for your suggestions! $\endgroup$ Apr 21, 2016 at 15:21

1 Answer 1

3
$\begingroup$

I always used the book "Enzyme Structure and Mechanism" by Alan Fersht. (Structure and Mechanism in Protein Science: A Guide to Enzyme Catalysis and Protein Folding is the latest version, published in 1998.) Both in some courses I did and when working on (complex) enzymatic mechanisms. It's a classic (so a bit old maybe), but it covers all the basics and includes most of the common complex mechanisms like ping-pong. I don't know if it will teach you how to analyze multivariate data, so maybe you need something else for that.

$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Yes, thank you for mentioning this one. It is excellent, and it is a classic. I have an older version somewhere but I could not remember the name. $\endgroup$
    – mdperry
    Apr 21, 2016 at 17:59

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .