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It's common knowledge that it's released via the urethra, but where does it originate? If it doesn't come from a part of the clitoris, then why is the clitoral glans called the clitoral glans? How does it travel from the originating spot to the urethra?

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According to this article female ejaculate is produced by the Skene glands.

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    $\begingroup$ That article actually states that the ejaculate is mostly urine... $\endgroup$ – Marius Apr 29 '16 at 9:46
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    $\begingroup$ @Marius No it says there are "small amounts of urine" in some samples. And being female, I can tell you ejaculate and urine are vastly different. Nearly every sense a healthy human has can differentiate between ejaculate and urine. $\endgroup$ – Metamorph Apr 30 '16 at 19:16
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    $\begingroup$ @Metamorph I don't understand your comment. Your link does say that in 2 out of 7 women, the ejaculate was identical to the urine sample taken beforehand, and for the other five, it was only slightly different: "they either release plain old urine, or urine that's been diluted by fluids from the female prostate glands." they found small amounts of PSA in addition to urine. Where are you getting "small amounts of urine" from? $\endgroup$ – YviDe May 1 '16 at 17:00
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    $\begingroup$ @YviDe The question asked where it comes from, and a quick google gave me this. Discussing it's composition isn't relevant. I've given an answer where no one else has, so critiquing mine with something I haven't mentioned doesn't make sense. $\endgroup$ – Metamorph May 3 '16 at 3:29
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    $\begingroup$ I wasn't at all critiquing your answer, I was asking why you answered @Marius 's comment about the article you linked with "No, it says X" when the link you answered with seems to be saying the exact opposite. $\endgroup$ – YviDe May 3 '16 at 4:52
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I had written up an answer to a now-deleted post about 3 years ago addressing this very question, so I thought I'd copy my answer from that deleted post here:


The answer is dependent on which fluid (vaginal lubricant or female ejaculate) you are referring to. Since you mention both, I will address both.

Vaginal lubricant

Quoting from wikipedia > vaginal lubrification

Vaginal lubrication is a naturally produced fluid that lubricates a woman's vagina. Vaginal lubrication is always present, but production increases significantly near ovulation and during sexual arousal in anticipation of sexual intercourse. Vaginal dryness is the condition in which this lubrication is insufficient, and sometimes artificial lubricants are used to augment it. Without sufficient lubrication, sexual intercourse can be painful to women. The vaginal lining has no glands, and therefore the vagina must rely on other methods of lubrication. Plasma seepage from vaginal walls due to vascular engorgement is considered to be the chief lubrication source, and the Bartholin's glands, located slightly below and to the left and right of the introitus (vaginal opening), also secrete mucus to augment vaginal-wall secretions. Near ovulation, cervical mucous provides additional lubrication.


Female ejaculate

Salama et al. (2015) from the Journal of Sexual Medicine feel fairly confident that they have good evidence that female ejaculate is actually urine from the bladder.

However, this topic has been under scrutiny for some time. I have seen numerous suggestions (though little hard evidence) that the Skene's glands (which are homologous to the male prostate) are responsible. This belief originated from the early work of Ernst Gräfenberg (yeah, the namesake of the G-spot). However, Salanas et al. (2015) did confirm the presence of at least marginal levels of prostatic secretions (e.g., PSA) in female ejaculate from their study. This at least partially corroborates the involvement of the Skeen's glands in the ejaculatory process. Bartholin glands (homologous to male Bulbourethral glands) have also been assumed to play a role. Further, Salanas et al. are not the first to propose that the ejaculate originates from the urethra. You can find a relatively simple outline and list of citations on the matter on Wikipedia.

We'll have to see how the scientific community responds to the work of Salama et al. ...

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