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Let's consider this scenario: You do sports in the morning in a fasted state (i.e. without consuming any calories after waking). Your brain of course needs glucose and your liver probably still has some of it in stock. So it keeps releasing it. Is there a mechanism to prevent the working muscles from consuming the glucose (so that the brain can be supplied longer)? If yes, how does it work?

(Please answer not too technically, so that people outside this area can also understand it.)

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closed as primarily opinion-based by rg255, AliceD, James, March Ho, Atl LED May 27 '16 at 14:19

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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In general it is the reciprical action of the hormones of the fed and fasted state — insulin and glucagon — that are responsible for this, together with the differences in hormone-sensitivity of the glucose transporters in muscle and brain. See the accepted answer to this question: During starvation, does the human body do anything to prioritize which organs receive nutrients?.

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