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Is there a way to get white blood cells to move while on a microscope slide? I want to try to get some microscope images of them moving, but so far I have only found them stationary.

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Not an experimentalist, so take this with a grain of salt. But for motility you often need some external factor, e.g. a chemokine or chemoattractant (FMLP is a common one for white blood cells). Also some cell types may not crawl on bare glass, and might need a protein or gelatin coating.

White blood cells on slides can look like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnlULOjUhSQ

Unfortunately, I don't know the conditions used there. My recommendation is to look through Google Scholar for white blood cell motility or neutrophil motility, and see what turns up. For instance, the first paper I found was: C S Spada, A L Nieves, A H Krauss and D F Woodward, J. Leuk. Biol. 1994 (PDF) which gives some details about how they got their assays to work, including a gelatin coating for the slides. However, the details probably depend on the origin of your cells and the type of white blood cell you're looking at.

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White blood cells move. As long as they're alive, they move, but they do it veeeeeery slowly. The movements can be seen using time-lapse photography. See: https://www.wetenschapsforum.nl/index.php/topic/199938-levend-bloed-onder-de-microscoop/

These were made at about 1,000x, anoptral contrast.

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