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does SIV cause AIDS in primates or have they developed resistance to the virus **

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closed as off-topic by rg255, MattDMo, kmm, AliceD, James Jun 5 '16 at 5:53

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Homework questions are off-topic on Biology unless you have shown your attempt at an answer. For more information see our homework policy." – rg255, MattDMo, kmm
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Homework questions and trivial questions about basic biological concepts are off-topic on Biology unless you have shown your attempt at an answer. For more information see our homework policy. This question can easily be answered by a Google search. $\endgroup$ – MattDMo Jun 3 '16 at 11:37
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    $\begingroup$ While the question doesn't show much effort, I'm not sure it looks like a homework question - and I certainly wouldn't call it a trivial question (apparently Nature agrees). $\endgroup$ – arboviral Jun 3 '16 at 14:20
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From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simian_immunodeficiency_virus:

Unlike HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections in humans, SIV infections in their natural hosts appear in many cases to be non-pathogenic. Extensive studies in sooty mangabeys have established that SIVsmm infection does not cause any disease in these animals, despite high levels of circulating virus. However, if this virus infects an Asian or Indian rhesus macaque, the animal will develop simian AIDS (SAIDS).[5] A recent study of SIVcpz in wild living chimpanzees suggests that infected chimpanzees experience an AIDS-like illness similar to HIV-1 infected humans. The later stages of SIV infection turn into SAIDS, much as HIV infection turns into AIDS.

Later in the article:

Beatrice Hahn of the University of Pennsylvania and a team of researchers in 2009 found that chimpanzees do die from simian AIDS in the wild and that the AIDS outbreak in Africa has contributed to the decline of chimpanzee populations. Testing wild chimpanzees, researchers detected organ and tissue damage similar to late-stage human AIDS. The infected chimpanzees had a 10 to 16 times greater risk of dying than uninfected ones; infected females were less likely to give birth, could pass the virus to their infants, and had a higher infant mortality rate than uninfected females.

A couple of key references:

Keele, B. F. et al. "Increased mortality and AIDS-like immunopathology in wild chimpanzees infected with SIVcpz" Nature 460, 515-519

Commentary on the above: Hayden, EK (2009) "Wild chimpanzees get AIDS-like illness" (DOI: 10.1038/news.2009.711)

Heeney J, Dalgleish A, Weiss R (2006) "Origins of HIV and the evolution of resistance to AIDS" Science 313(5786): 462–466

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