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Does anyone know what this insect is?

I think it's a moth and need further identification like scientific name, order and family.

The picture was taken on May 30/2016 in my university laboratory window in South Korea. At that time there were so many moths on this building. The temperature was also high and it was also daytime around lunch time. What I want to ask related to flying time is do moths fly at daytime? as far as I know moths are nocturnal. Please clarify this too if this insect species is moth.

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    $\begingroup$ Hi, maybe you'll find these hints helpful in improving your question: biology.stackexchange.com/help/how-to-ask. Temperature was high... high for where? Also do moths fly in the daytime is a seperate question, as is are all moths nocturnal. $\endgroup$
    – Troyseph
    Jun 14, 2016 at 12:50
  • $\begingroup$ @ Troyseph what is wrong with my question,Sir? $\endgroup$
    – Meti
    Jun 14, 2016 at 13:02
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    $\begingroup$ It was poorly formatted such that the picture wasn't visible and you had a block of text with random '[' characters in it. You ask multiple questions. You show no attempt at your own research into its type. You gave details which are completely useless to us, i.e. the temperature was high... did your building have the heating on? Do you live in Florida or Iceland? is high 24 degrees C or 34 degrees c? Please put some effort into your question so that someone might put effort into an answer for you =] $\endgroup$
    – Troyseph
    Jun 14, 2016 at 13:09
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    $\begingroup$ @Meti please edit your question and post where exactly the picture was taken. in my university laboratory window is not helpful at all. I would also strongly suggest you take the tour and read carefully through the help center to learn more about the site. Editing of questions (and answers) is encouraged, subject to some guidelines. You should also read this Meta.SE question, especially the section Editing and Formatting. $\endgroup$
    – MattDMo
    Jun 14, 2016 at 13:43
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    $\begingroup$ Am very sorry @ Troyseph I didn't know that. @MattDMo I will take all your suggestions and advice into consideration. $\endgroup$
    – Meti
    Jun 14, 2016 at 13:58

1 Answer 1

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It is a moth and all moths and butterflies belong to the order of Lepidoptera. Based on the shape of the forewing and the orange color of the hindwings I think this moth belongs to the genus Catocala https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catocala, see also here for some pictures.

EDIT: theforestecologist did a excellent suggestion that this might be Catocala streckeri based on the wing pattern. This species does occur in Korea, see this website for a distribution map. So it may indeed be Catocala streckeri. However, Asia is very rich in Catacola species, and I know that this family often has species looking very alike, so I can't say with 100% certainty.

Most, but not all, moths are nocturnal. Some Catocala species are known to fly on sunny afternoons (Waring&Townsend 2006).

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    $\begingroup$ thank you for your response. The picture was taken in South Korea. $\endgroup$
    – Meti
    Jun 16, 2016 at 13:05
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    $\begingroup$ Catocala streckeri seems like a pretty good guess given the wing pattern. I'd add it as my own answer, but obviously cannot because the question is closed. $\endgroup$ Dec 15, 2016 at 5:06
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    $\begingroup$ @theforestecologist: excellent find. I'll add it to my answer. $\endgroup$
    – RHA
    Dec 15, 2016 at 15:43

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