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I saw a video on youtube of a professor saying it's because of the quantity of peas. So Mendel would never have published his work if by any chance he had found a pea with recombination.

Someone can explain to me in a dummie way the reason?

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    $\begingroup$ Mendel did not do sufficient number of experiments. :P $\endgroup$ – WYSIWYG Jun 30 '16 at 14:15
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    $\begingroup$ Both are real biologists. Mendel pioneered genetics and his findings provided leads for others. In the process of science there is continuous validation and re-examination of facts. Some may be proven false; that doesn't mean that the initial scientists did not contribute anything. $\endgroup$ – WYSIWYG Jun 30 '16 at 14:37
  • $\begingroup$ But the reason is because he did not do sufficient number of experiments. Do you have some biological way to explain this to me? $\endgroup$ – jarwin Jun 30 '16 at 15:00
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    $\begingroup$ Before Mendel, humans has been trying to figure out heredity for over 2000 years without being able to reach any conclusions more specific then that offspring tend to inherit the traits of their parents. This is because the full process of inheritance is staggeringly complex. Mendel's contribution was to demonstrate that there were least a few traits that were inherited in specific and quantifiable patterns. He had to look very hard to find those traits. As @swbarnes2 suggests, his search may have led him to traits on separate chromosomes, eliminating the complication of recombination. $\endgroup$ – Charles E. Grant Jun 30 '16 at 18:00
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    $\begingroup$ Of course, it's also possible that he looked at more than 7 traits, but didn't publish on traits which violated his laws. The probability of randomly picking 7 traits on 7 chromosomes is quite low. $\endgroup$ – swbarnes2 Jun 30 '16 at 21:31
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I'm not sure what you mean by "recombination". Peas have 7 chromosomes. Mendel's seven published traits are each on a different chromosome. Mendel's second law states that all genes assort independently. This is wrong, but it is correct for genes located on different chromosomes, which Mendel's were.

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  • $\begingroup$ Actually, two of them are in the same chromosome. $\endgroup$ – user24284 Jul 1 '16 at 4:52

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