3
$\begingroup$

Recently an interesting study has reported. Zhou et al., 2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10...3/jcb.201605101

According to this study, enhancing anterograde axon transport of mitochondria is essential for regeneration of injured axons.

Neurons need a large amount of energy provided by ATP to extend their axons when they are injured. Mitochondria transported to axons produces ATP which is necessary for that.

This study shows that in mature neurons, the motility of mitochondria is reduced and the reduced mitochondrial motility might be the cause of the deficit in regrowth capacity of mature neurons. Moreover, this study found that enhancing mitochondria transport enables mature neurons to recover their regrowth capacity.

It is said that mature neurons typically arrest their cell cycle and fail to proliferate and regrow. However, considering the fact that only enhancing mitochondria transport enables mature neuron to recover their regrowth capacity, I can't help but doubt the commonly accepted theory.

Do mature neurons actually not arrest their cell cycle?

What do you think of this finding ?

$\endgroup$
7
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Why do you think this contradicts the fact that neurons are cell cycle arrested? There is no DNA replication or cell division, and mitochondria can proliferate independent of cell cycle as well. $\endgroup$ – WYSIWYG Jul 21 '16 at 7:13
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry that I couldn't convey to you what I wanted to tell. $\endgroup$ – ironKUMA Jul 22 '16 at 12:49
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry that I couldn't convey to you what I wanted to tell. What proliferates isn't mitochondria but axons are. Moreover, only enhancing mitochondria transport to axons enables even the mature neurons to regrow. So, I doubt if the mature neurons actually don't arrest their cell cycle. $\endgroup$ – ironKUMA Jul 22 '16 at 13:05
  • $\begingroup$ Axons grow but that is not same as cell is proceeding through cell cycle. Cell grows in size but there is no cell division. It is still arrested. However during this process some growth related genes are upregulated which are also upregulated in actively dividing cells. $\endgroup$ – WYSIWYG Jul 22 '16 at 16:21
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Okay. Does this answer your question? I shall post this as answer, in that case. $\endgroup$ – WYSIWYG Jul 23 '16 at 4:48
1
$\begingroup$

Axons grow but that is not same as cell is proceeding through cell cycle. Cell grows in size but there is no cell division. It is still arrested. However during this process some growth related genes are upregulated which are also upregulated in actively dividing cells.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.